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Thread: Sheet metal forming and die design

  1. #1
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    Sheet metal forming and die design

    Hello all,

    I need help on a die (if i am not wrong on how tool is called) design. I need to form a hole with radius on a sheet metal. Maybe anyone have some useful online links or books on a subject, where I could get started? I drew a part similar to what i need, but can not attach it here somehow.

    Any help would be appreciated!

  2. #2
    Administrator Kelly Bramble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karolys View Post
    Hello all,

    I need to form a hole with radius on a sheet metal. I drew a part similar to what i need, but can not attach it here somehow.

    Any help would be appreciated!
    A picture would be helpful as your description does not seem logical (all holes have a radius).

    How to post an image on Engineers Edge Forums

    Sheet Metal Design and Applications

    Manufacturing Processes

  3. #3
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    I agree with Kelly that the drawing will help a lot; but, if you are seeking a hole with a radiused top edge or a rounded top entry then you may require a two step arrangement: first, one die to stamp a clean hole and then a second die to either radius the upper hole edge or extrude the metal surrounding the hole to form a radiused entry depending on which of those alternative configurations you are seeking.

  4. #4
    Administrator Kelly Bramble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAlberts View Post
    I agree with Kelly that the drawing will help a lot; but, if you are seeking a hole with a radiused top edge or a rounded top entry then you may require a two step arrangement: first, one die to stamp a clean hole and then a second die to either radius the upper hole edge or extrude the metal surrounding the hole to form a radiused entry depending on which of those alternative configurations you are seeking.
    I just had a visual.... Thanks JAlberts

    See: Sheet Metal Countersink Video - about third or half way into the video

  5. #5
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    Kaitv180.jpg
    This is a fast drawing of what i need.

    To start with, a hole would be laser-cut. I need just to form its edges.
    So im wondering, if there is some literature, that would help to design the tool, for something exactly like this?

  6. #6
    Administrator Kelly Bramble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karolys View Post
    Kaitv180.jpg
    This is a fast drawing of what i need.

    To start with, a hole would be laser-cut. I need just to form its edges.
    So i'm wondering, if there is some literature, that would help to design the tool, for something exactly like this?
    The geometry looks very manufacturable to me - less information on the size, radius and tolerance expectations. In general, you can design the geometry you need and submit for a manufacturing review by a sheetmetal expert. This is a great way to get an education..

    See the following books as well:

    Die Design Fundamentals, Third Edition

    Sheet Metal Stamping Dies, Die Design and Die Making Practices

    Metalworking Sink or Swim

  7. #7
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    Thanks! Very useful literature it seems to me.

    Also, sorry for the possibly stupid question, what do you mean by "submit for a manufacturing review by a sheetmetal expert"?

  8. #8
    Administrator Kelly Bramble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karolys View Post
    what do you mean by "submit for a manufacturing review by a sheetmetal expert"?
    Submit your design to the person or organization that will actually manufacture the tool or end-item sheet metal part.

    Those whom physically build stuff are usually "experts" and can provide valuable insight and suggestions on how to improve your design.

  9. #9
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    The thing is, we only sent them a 3D models and the drawings. They gonna design the tool themselves. What i want to, is to get at least some experience in the field of this tool design, that i could talk to them, and be able to explain what i want properly and in general to learn. Later gonna compare my design to theirs, see how it differs.

    Thanks for the help!

  10. #10
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    This is a great stuff about the metal sheet forming. The ideas are fine and give us nice information.

  11. #11
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    spring steel strip

    I want to produce a sheet metal part (30mm*3mm*0.3mm).
    And the specimen was formed from progressive sheet metal die.
    And the application of this part requires the elasticity (return to the original position after unloading) at the free end of the part.
    And at the same time, we cannot form the material that has high elasticity because its high spring back.
    My search on internet reach me to “heat treatable annealed spring steel” because before the forming process, the material has low tensile strength (the forming process occurs easily) and after the forming process, we can make a heat treatment to increase the tensile strength to gain the required elasticity during its application.
    What is your recommended grade of this steel?
    And What is the method of heat treatment that I apply after the forming process?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
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    Progressive die stamping is a metal forming process largely used to produce different parts for various industries, which includes automotive, electronics and appliances. Progressive die stamping consists of several individual work stations, each of which performs one or more different operations on the part. The part is carried from station to station by the stock strip and is cut out of the strip in the final operation. In practice, a critical part of die development is the configuration of the punches and dies. Not only the punches and dies are accommodated in the die holder, but also the other die elements. Modern forging dies are configured for various stations. This includes forging, calibration, punching or trimming procedures that are possible in the same operation (using four- or five-station die sets commonly found in operation today). The special dies and closing dies significantly reduces production costs which are related to additional processing after the forging process.

    I hope this will be helpful!

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