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N to Nm conversion formula
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Posted by: eMOJO

02/12/2010, 09:19:25

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I'm needing some help with converting N to Nm

Is there a formula for this conversion and what information will be required. I realise these are two different forms of measurement but surely it can be done with the correct information supplied.

Sorry if I sound like a noob... but I am








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: N to Nm conversion formula
: N to Nm conversion formula -- eMOJO Post Reply Top of thread Engineering Forum
Posted by: jboggs

02/12/2010, 12:37:11

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If you are talking about Newtons and Newton-meters, its not just a matter of "two different systems", like inches and feet, two different measurements of length. They measure two different things. Its like asking for a conversion between grams and liters - two different things. Newtons are units of linear force. Newton-meters measure torque, better understood as "rotary force". Check reference sources for more information.







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Posted by: eMOJO

02/13/2010, 05:40:39

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Yep, realise that that's why I asked what additional information would be required... any help would be much appreciated. Cheers







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Posted by: Kelly Bramble

02/13/2010, 10:16:29

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OK, this is basics -

Think of N-m like lbs-ft - this is how torque is measured.

For example - a one ft long torque wrench and you apply 10 lbs of force to it. This will apply 10lbs-ft or torque to the fastener or whatever.

N or Newtons is another unit of force in imperial units one would use pounds or lbs.

If you stand on a weight scale and you weight 160 lbs this would convert to N by multiplying 160 pound by 4.4482216 to get Newtons.

In summary - there is not an equation to simply convert N to N-m. These are not compatable units as you need a distance component.








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Posted by: eMOJO

02/14/2010, 22:41:37

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Yep, I understand all that... I guess what I'm looking for, and maybe my thread title isn't asking the right question, but I have a measurement in Newtons and I'm assuming this measurement in force is required in a formula, with additional information, to calculate Newton Meters for torque.

I know it won't be a straight conversion... so my question should actually read 'what is the formula for calculating Nm'








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Posted by: jboggs

02/15/2010, 07:49:54

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Force * Distance = Torque

The "additional information" you are looking for is the perpendicular distance from the center of rotation to the centerline of that force.








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Posted by: kunk

02/23/2010, 03:05:49

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the answer is stated right there in your question. the force is newtons and the distance is meters...kunk







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