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Drafting Standards
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Posted by: Tom77

07/24/2007, 12:09:00

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I have been asked to review our companies new drafting standards manual. We use AutoCAD and generally use either B-size or D-size templates in AutoCAD to create the drawings. We always print out our hard copies as B-size prints. The guy writing the manual specified that text should be created at .12 inches high in AutoCAD when creating a B-size drawing and at .14 inches high in AutoCad when creating D-size drawings. When we print the D-size drawing out on a B-size piece of paper, the text actually measures only about .07 inches tall. To me that seems kind of small. Is there an industry standard for minimum text height printed out on a B-size (11x17) inch piece of paper? Also, I like to draw everything 1 to 1 and scale the drawing border to what ever fits nicely over the drawing, but the drafting department says it more important to keep the borders consistent and scale the drawing to fit the border. Which way is more standard? We state on our drawings that they conform to ASME Y14.100-2000. Also our drafting manual states that you need many different layers for solid lines, hidden lines, text, dimensions, the border,etc. Is there a real requirement for so many layers?







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Re: Drafting Standards
Re: Drafting Standards -- Tom77 Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: sciyer

08/12/2007, 09:57:20

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I would use Model space and Paper space. All component geometry would be in Model Space and all annotations including templates, dimensions and Notes would be in Paper Space (Layouts). This way you can have B size layouts and geometry can be any size. I am from the metric age, hence I use a text height of 3.5 mm (a little more that 0.125")




SRINIVASAN C IYER


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Re: Drafting Standards
Re: Drafting Standards -- Tom77 Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: jboggs

07/25/2007, 10:06:31

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I've been doing this long enough to finally accept the fact that different engineering disciplines will legitimately have different CAD requirements. So it depends on what you are drawing. That said, it is very difficult for me to understand ANY reason for scaling a drawing to fit a border, ever. But lazy, sloppy, or poorly trained drafters will still find an excuse to do it. As far as the "not true A,B,D size" statement, I challenge you to find any difference in the plotted output between two drawings, one having a scaled border and one a scaled model - if the scaling was done properly. The only way the plot could be "not true" is if someone scales X and Y axes differently, another example of lazy or poorly trained drafters. Also, avoid non-standard scale settings if at all possible.

Once a model is scaled to fit a border, you are just creating a big hole for future users to fall through as they incorrectly measure some distance. Murphy rules!

Now, about layers. Their use should depend on their purpose. The ability to turn them on and off at will surely gives them greater value than to just be assigned to "hidden lines" or "center lines" or whatever. Give them some real meaning! In my work of designing machines, I put each part on a separate layer, including any hidden lines associated with that part. I format the hidden lines so they plot at a lighter weight, but they remain on that part's layer. Building drawings will have columns, walls, foundations, electrical, plumbing, etc. all on separate layers. The only reason to create "hidden line" and "center line" layers is so that all elements will have BYLAYER color and linetype. So what?

If I've offended, please pardon my rant.








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Re: Re: Drafting Standards
Re: Re: Drafting Standards -- jboggs Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Marky

07/25/2007, 13:10:50

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THERE YA GO AGAIN J....Scareing the kids again. Point well taken...no offense taken on my end.




I'll kindly pay you Tuesday..for a hamburger today....Whimpy


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Re: Re: Drafting Standards
Re: Re: Drafting Standards -- jboggs Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Kelly Bramble

07/25/2007, 10:31:26

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Too me, drafting standards and CAD standards are interrelated, however different. Drafting standards have been in place for eons and CAD standards depend on the CAD software and the particular application. No, a model should never be created out of scale as the drafting file on most software packages allow for scaling to any preferred scale. Creating a model out of scale opens the door for many problems and a mistake is likely to occur.

Ultimately CAD standards are created to get everybody organizing a model and drafting file the same. There is nothing worst than to open a CAD model and not be able to find anything. The fact that their modeling practices work for them does not ensure that the rest of the world does not require 30 minutes just to figure out what they are doing. CAD standards are there to get everybody more productive and allow seamless use of the CAD files by everybody - established and new.

It has been my experience that many folks are very passionate about their CAD preferences. Establishing a reasonable standard that everybody can use is often challenging. For anybody going down this road I have one suggestion - keep it simple.







Modified by Kelly Bramble at Wed, Jul 25, 2007, 10:32:36


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Re: Drafting Standards
Re: Drafting Standards -- Tom77 Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Marky

07/24/2007, 12:35:55

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I use these guys for my standards www.global.ihs.com whenever I've needed them.

Your drafting dept is correct, scale the part and keep the border to scale...otherwise it's not a true A,B..D size.

It's also ok to deviate from the ASME/ANSI standards for your company...that's why "The Guy" is creating a standard for YOUR company...instead of buying several copies of ASME standards and handing them out

The drafting standard that's be created is just for consistancy..just so you and Joe Blow next to you are consistant...it also helps check the design of a model.

If you are checking the manual....ask for the source(s) of where the info for the manual came from.

You should feel lucky that you are with a company that still cares about the quality of a drawing.

Good Luck!!!





I'll kindly pay you Tuesday..for a hamburger today....Whimpy


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Re: Re: Drafting Standards
Re: Re: Drafting Standards -- Marky Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Kelly Bramble

07/24/2007, 13:53:53

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I beleive industry standard text size is .125 for A - C size drawings and .14 for D and larger formats.

I agree with Marky regarding the Global Engineering Drawings Book. This book incorporates all of industries drafting, drawing, and engineering/design process into one large reference book. I believe the book is available in print and a network copy.

No need to reinvent standards.








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Re: Re: Re: Drafting Standards
Re: Re: Re: Drafting Standards -- Kelly Bramble Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: swearingen

07/25/2007, 10:39:43

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You do know that Autocad offers a way to both draw the model at 1 to 1 AND make them fit a consistent border - it's the model space/paper space function. Check into it. We use it all the time...







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Re: Re: Re: Re: Drafting Standards
Re: Re: Re: Re: Drafting Standards -- swearingen Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: rusty105

07/26/2007, 08:05:06

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I'll second that comment about the model/paper space feature in AutoCad. I am not sure all CAD packages have it, but since you mentioned AutoCad....
To go further... Draw your site plan, machine part, or what ever at full scale . Then set up different paper space layouts with the correct border for the size print you want. At this point the paper space is also 1:1 Once you have the title block and border set up to your liking, you open 'view ports' on the paper space layout. Each 'view port' is a window to your model, seperate from other view ports on the same paper space layout, Each with their own scale, view angle, etc... The feature is there, use it.

Rusty








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