Related Resources: Design for Manufacturing

Manufacturing Technology Advances

Manufacturing Process and Design
Design for Manufacturing and Assembly

Manufacturing Technology Advances
Lecture Notes
212 Pages

Open: Manufacturing Technology Advances

Manufacturing is fundamental for the welfare of modern society in terms of its contribution to employment and value added. In the European Union almost 10 % of all enterprises (2.1 million) were classified to manufacturing (Eurostat 2013). With regards to the central role of manufacturing, the European Commission (2012) aims to increase the share of manufacturing from 16 % of GDP (2012) to 20 % by 2020.

Manufacturing companies in high-wage countries are challenged with increasing volatile and global markets, short innovation cycles, cost-pressure and mostly expensive resources. However, these challenges can also open up new business opportunities for companies if they are able to produce customer-specific products at mass production costs and if they can rapidly adapt to the market dynamics while assuring optimised use of resources. Today, the two dichotomies behind those capabilities are not yet resolved: Individual products that match the specific customer demands (scope) generally result in unit costs far above those of mass production (scale). Moreover, the optimisation of resources with sophisticated planning tools and highly automated production systems (planning orientation) mostly leads to less adaptability than achievable with simple and robust value stream oriented process chains (value orientation).

The research within the Cluster of Excellence aims to achieve sustainable competiveness by resolving the two dichotomies between scale and scope and between plan and value orientation (Brecher et al. 2011). Therefore, the cluster incorporates and advances key technologies by combining expertise from different fields of production engineering and materials science aiming to provide technological solutions that increase productivity, adaptability and innovation speed. In addition, sustainable competiveness requires models and methods to understand, predict and control the behaviour of complex, socio-technical production systems. From the perspective of technical sub-systems the complexity can often be reduced to the main functional characteristics and interaction laws that can be described by physical or other formal models. These deterministic models enhance predictability allowing to speed-up the design of products and production processes.

TOC

1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Christian Brecher and Denis Özdemir
Part I Towards a New Theory of Production

2 Hypotheses for a Theory of Production in the Context
of Industrie 4.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Günther Schuh, Christina Reuter, Annika Hauptvogel and Christian Dölle

3 The Production Logistic Theory as an Integral Part of a Theory
of Production Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Julian Becker and Peter Nyhuis
Part II Individualised Production

4 Business Models with Additive Manufacturing—Opportunities
and Challenges from the Perspective of Economics
and Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Frank T. Piller, Christian Weller and Robin Kleer

5 SLM Production Systems: Recent Developments in Process
Development, Machine Concepts and Component Design . . . . . . . . 49
Reinhart Poprawe, Christian Hinke, Wilhelm Meiners,
Johannes Schrage, Sebastian Bremen and Simon Merkt
Part III Virtual Production Systems

6 Meta-Modelling Techniques Towards Virtual
Production Intelligence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Wolfgang Schulz and Toufik Al Khawli

7 Designing New Forging Steels by ICMPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Wolfgang Bleck, Ulrich Prahl, Gerhard Hirt and Markus Bambach
Part IV Integrated Technologies

8 Productivity Improvement Through the Application
of Hybrid Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Bert Lauwers, Fritz Klocke, Andreas Klink, Erman Tekkaya,
Reimund Neugebauer and Donald McIntosh

9 The Development of Incremental Sheet Forming from Flexible
Forming to Fully Integrated Production of Sheet Metal Parts. . . . . 117
Gerhard Hirt, Markus Bambach, Wolfgang Bleck,
Ulrich Prahl and Jochen Stollenwerk

10 IMKS and IMMS—Two Integrated Methods for the
One-Step-Production of Plastic/Metal Hybrid Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Christian Hopmann, Kirsten Bobzin, Mathias Weber,
Mehmet Öte, Philipp Ochotta and Xifang Liao
Part V Self-Optimising Production Systems

11 A Symbolic Approach to Self-optimisation in Production System
Analysis and Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Christopher M. Schlick, Marco Faber, Sinem Kuz
and Jennifer Bützler

12 Approaches of Self-optimising Systems in Manufacturing. . . . . . . . 161
Fritz Klocke, Dirk Abel, Christian Hopmann, Thomas Auerbach,
Gunnar Keitzel, Matthias Reiter, Axel Reßmann,
Sebastian Stemmler and Drazen Veselovac

13 Adaptive Workplace Design Based on Biomechanical
Stress Curves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Stefan Graichen, Thorsten Stein and Barbara Deml
Part VI Human Factors in Production Technology

14 Human Factors in Production Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Philipp Brauner and Martina Ziefle

15 Human Factors in Product Development and Design . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Robert Schmitt, Björn Falk, Sebastian Stiller and Verena Heinrichs

Contribute Article
Spider Optimizer

© Copyright 2000 - 2019, by Engineers Edge, LLC www.engineersedge.com
All rights reserved
Disclaimer | Feedback | Advertising | Contact

Date/Time:


User Reviews/Comments:

There are currently no comments available.


Add a Comment (you must be logged in to post comment Register):
Name:
Email: (Optional)
Comment: