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Posted by: pavan85_levis

07/30/2009, 03:00:54

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what is the use of layout in AUTOCAD.







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Re: AUTOCAD
Re: AUTOCAD -- pavan85_levis Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: PSR900s

02/24/2010, 22:32:59

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Hello, I have been using Autocad since Ver 2.4. The two most useless things in Autocad (for production work) is Paperspace and Xref.
Using paperspace; if the model is moved or amended the whole paperspace becomes irrelevant. I have received drawings from people where the dimensions and notes bore no resemblance to the picture because the model had been moved.
Xref: Again, Xref only really works when using the program in-house. I received a "drawing" which had only green spots and "note" "Xref". Windows, door and some other things had not been included.
Just be VERY wary when using these tools.







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Re: AUTOCAD
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Posted by: jboggs

09/17/2009, 22:30:11

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"Layout" is the term AutoCAD uses now for what they used to call "paperspace". It is a method that allows one to account for the differences in scale between the real world (modelspace), and the limitations of a paper border (paperspace). Rule #1 in CAD is that everything is always drawn at full scale, period. Now, how to present a "picture" of this model on paper that is not that large - the scale factor comes in. The notations on a drawing have a size too, but their size is in relation to the paper on which they are presented, not the size of the object they are describing. So if you scale a model down to fit the paper, you don't want the notation text diminishing to an unreadable size. Paperspace, or layout as its called now, allows you to set your notation size and create all your notes in one environment, and then open "windows" to look at selected portions of your model, at whatever scale you select. This way the model itself always remains at full size, but you don't have to struggle with changing drawing scales affecting your text size. Clear as mud, right?







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Posted by: timmyo

03/08/2010, 15:27:14

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The nice thing about layouts is that you can have an unlimited amount of pages in a plan set based off of one parent drawing. You still draw the drawing in real dimensions the same way you always do in Autocad in model space and then you can make plan sheets for each different layout that display the drawing in paper space. Essentially, it is paper space with the added ability to have several "paper spaces" or plan sheets in a single dwg file. I don't think this feature was available until the late 1990's. Before that, you had to have each paper space page in a plan set have its own file and then the file would reference or Xreference the model space drawing. I hope that this explanation makes sense.







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