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Thread: radial load on planet gear box

  1. #1
    Associate Engineer
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    Jul 2011
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    radial load on planet gear box

    I have built a rotation attachment for one of our machines. It works fine. But I would love to know what the radial load would be on my gearbox. Or a simple way to find it. My output speed is 25rpms with out put torque of 35000ftlbs. I have a outputshaft coming off my gearbox flang that sticks off 36 inches. If my output shaft gets loaded from my torque at 36 inches. What would my radial load be at the flange. If someone could help thanks.

  2. #2
    Technical Fellow
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    Feb 2011
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    Hi Ron, Welcome to the forum.

    I am a little confused, do you have a sketch or picture of the thing? If it is as I think it is, then the torque is going to be the same at the end of the 36" shaft as it is at the flange -- unless -- the shaft is 1" diameter and winding up 3 turns before rotating the load.

    OK, so I am winding you up with the shaft winding up, but the load the gearbox is resisting is the same as the output torque. If that is what you are asking.

    We could use some more details.


    Dave
    Generally, I will not give you the answer to your question, but I will guide you into discovering how to solve this yourself.
    Insanity: "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." Albert Einstein

  3. #3
    Technical Fellow jboggs's Avatar
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    Dave,
    He could be talking about overhung load, if he has the gearbox shaft actually carrying the load.

    Ron,
    If that is the case, it is generally not a good idea. Gearboxes have limited overhung load capacity.
    Usually "radial load" has nothing to do with speed or torque. It is created by the geometry to the loading and support points, thus the need for a sketch or picture.

    Joe

  4. #4
    Technical Fellow
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    Quote Originally Posted by jboggs View Post
    He could be talking about overhung load, if he has the gearbox shaft actually carrying the load.
    Hi Joe,

    Yup, it could be anything that's why we need more information sketch/drawing/pic etc. But, he mentioned "radial" (suggests torque) several times so it is anyone's guess what he wants to know.

    If Ron returns with more details, I am sure we can help no matter what load or where that he is interested in.

    Dave
    Generally, I will not give you the answer to your question, but I will guide you into discovering how to solve this yourself.
    Insanity: "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." Albert Einstein

  5. #5
    Principle Engineer
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Ron,
    Agree with all the comments and it is not the torque that is the problem but the way the torque is produced, since in most cases a gear or chain drive would remove the torque by a force times the radius of the gear or sprocket. It is that force that is the radial load.
    Fr=T/r
    T= torque
    r radius
    Fr the radial or overhang load which also produces an orthogonal torque (which is more problematical) on the shaft at the output flange equal in your case to 36*Fr.

  6. #6
    Ron,
    Please visit the following website for calculation of radial loads. I think the examples on the document also applies for your case.
    http://jeil1120.epart.net/design/tem...alculation.pdf

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