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Thread: Clutch feel improvement in motorcycle

  1. #1
    Associate Engineer
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    Clutch feel improvement in motorcycle

    I've identified the following areas in which some improvement is required:

    1. cable interference
    2. effect of cable radius
    3. force required for actuation w.r.t. angular deviation of clutch
    4. effect of change in length of lever on the actuation force
    5. half clutch judder testing
    6. cable lubricant

    Someone tell me if there are other areas on which improvements can be made, and if there are, how do I go about carrying them out?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Administrator Kelly Bramble's Avatar
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    On which make or model motorcycle are you referring to?

  3. #3
    Associate Engineer
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    Its a Bajaj Discover with a clutch operating load of around 4kg. Is there any way to educe this load without compromising on the spring rate of the clutch springs?

  4. #4
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    Yes, leverage, or, increase the number of clutch plates and disks to allow for lighter springs.

    The only place leverage (mechanical advantage) becomes practical is at the engine end. Changing the mechanical advantage at the lever on the handlebars will quickly extend beyond a comfortable reach-grip and travel for a normal length hand.

    You may try using PTFE lined cable sheaths to reduce some cable friction.

    Probably the best way would be to convert it all to hydraulics where you have a greater control over piston diameters to balance out good human-use and good engine-control. It could even include a vacuum boost-assist system.

    Hell, if money is no object, I am sure you could adapt an ABS braking system from a Goldwing/BMW etc. They have an electric pump that balances pressure which should be adaptable to an assist-method.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkertonD View Post
    Yes, leverage, or, increase the number of clutch plates and disks to allow for lighter springs.

    The only place leverage (mechanical advantage) becomes practical is at the engine end. Changing the mechanical advantage at the lever on the handlebars will quickly extend beyond a comfortable reach-grip and travel for a normal length hand.

    You may try using PTFE lined cable sheaths to reduce some cable friction.

    Probably the best way would be to convert it all to hydraulics where you have a greater control over piston diameters to balance out good human-use and good engine-control. It could even include a vacuum boost-assist system.

    Hell, if money is no object, I am sure you could adapt an ABS braking system from a Goldwing/BMW etc. They have an electric pump that balances pressure which should be adaptable to an assist-method.
    1. The clutch actuation force increases as i turn the handlebar. How can i eliminate that?
    2. Cable routing radius and cable length. How will that effect the feel of clutch?
    3. Lube. How much lube will be required for easy operation?
    thanks.

  6. #6
    Lead Engineer RWOLFEJR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grambaba View Post
    1. The clutch actuation force increases as i turn the handlebar. How can i eliminate that?
    2. Cable routing radius and cable length. How will that effect the feel of clutch?
    3. Lube. How much lube will be required for easy operation?
    thanks.
    You're kidding right?

  7. #7
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    RW+1-zillion

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PinkertonD View Post
    RW+1-zillion
    well i tried changing the clutch spring to test its effects on clutch force..
    when i changed the stiffness from 740 N/mm to 830 N/mm the clutch actuation force changed from 3.4kgf to 4.2kgf. The are 4 clutch plates manufactured by FCC rico and 4 clutch springs.
    My question is : what should be the ideal stiffness of the clutch return spring (which is a torsion spring) ?

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