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Thread: charging

  1. #1
    Project Engineer
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    Oct 2013
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    charging

    I have a client that's gone back on a spec they wrote 3 times now and ive provided 90% copletely fleshed out work each time. I took the job on at a flat rate trying to help them out because they made previous failed attempts at this unit. Now its almost done and I need to charge them for extra time and wonder how others approach this idea I have told them there would be extra. I don't see much discussion on here about this subject and wonder if its taboo on these boards?

  2. #2
    Administrator Kelly Bramble's Avatar
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    iI would explain to them that their changes are out of scope in regards to the original quote and additional charges apply.

    Make sure they know before you present them with your invoice.

  3. #3
    Lead Engineer
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    I agree with Kelly and also recommend you iterate each of their revisions and how each change effected your required work and the resulting price.

  4. #4
    Project Engineer
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    yes this is basically what I'm doing. This client has become very corporate since their tin shack and dirt floor days when I fist did something for them. The younguns that work there have adopted the attitude of "We want this change you do it and we will pay when you are done" Like it's a threat, I'm paraphrasing but it's funny in a way because they barely understand what they are asking for and what they have gotten. I'm starting to see the root of their failures in coming up with original equipment recently, Documenting everything is key now. They also "let go" a very talented young (I though anyway) guy with a lot of street smarts and good instincts for new ideas, he wasn't a good detail man, but they needed him and didn't realize what they had.. I guess he challenged their comfort zone too easily. Glad I don't work for large companies anymore.

  5. #5
    Technical Fellow jboggs's Avatar
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    I spent a lot of years in the consulting world. I learned several things:
    1. "Scope = work = cost" Therefore, change in scope = change in work = change in cost. Read that again. OK, now again. Once more just to be sure you got it.
    2. Consultants that don't explicitly cover this fact early and often with the client screw themselves in two ways: first they don't get paid for work done, and second they lose future business with that client because the client no longer trusts them.
    3. Clients will do business with consultants they trust before consultants they "like".
    4. Good clients will respect a professional consultant who protects his own interests by making item #1 clear up front. If they don't respect it, they aren't a good client, and you don't want their business.
    5. Help them to understand that you can be no more specific in your cost estimate than they can be in their scope definition. Clear scope produces clear costs. Unclear scope produces unclear costs.
    5. Let them move on to your competition if that's what it takes. Sometimes the best thing you can do for your business is to let your competition deal with the losers!
    Last edited by jboggs; 12-20-2013 at 09:43 AM.

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