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Thread: Counterbalance- upright calculation

  1. #1
    Associate Engineer
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    Counterbalance- upright calculation

    Hi everyone, this is my first post, and I can't lie that I did register solely to post this thread (which will spark many in the future based on my idea). I did use the search feature but I didn't find right away my exact question for this counterbalance. All the related threads i found had to do with pulley systems, levers, etc.

    I am trying to calculate the counterbalance for a something to stand upright. Whether it be on a table or floating in the water. I know COG will come into play in the calculation but I literally have no experience whatsoever. Basically what i am designing is going to be a container for a specific object.

    Thank you for any guidance and help!

  2. #2
    Lead Engineer
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    Not enough information, you need to be more specific about your planned assembly design.

  3. #3
    Associate Engineer
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    what other information it needed? I am not trying to be difficult just also not trying to explain exactly what my design is for obvious reasons....ill gladly provide as much info as i can if someone can tell me what is needed.

    The object will be floating, but needs to stay as upright as possible while floating....about 6" tall, about 1.6" will be under the water....Weight is TBA. prefer the bottom of the design to be flat for about 2.5" inches (if ever out of water for storage to stand flat).

    I dont expect anyone to calculate this for me, I just need guidance as to once i have my measurements and weights that I can attempt to calculate on my own..

    And as i said i have no experience in this area so i do apologize for my lack of information as i do not know what is needed for direction.

  4. #4
    Lead Engineer Cake of Doom's Avatar
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    So you need an object to float without capsizing?

    Wiki search for buoyancy <-- Is a good starting point.

  5. #5
    Technical Fellow jboggs's Avatar
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    Whatever your object is, if it is floating stationary in water, the center of gravity will be somewhere on a line directly underneath the center of buoyancy. Center of gravity is determined by distribution of mass of the floating assembly. Center of buoyancy is determined by the shape of the volume of displaced water.

  6. #6
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    if i were to get the proper measurements and weights etc would someone calculate the center of buoyancy for me and then go from there?

  7. #7
    Administrator Kelly Bramble's Avatar
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    Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.

  8. #8
    Technical Fellow jboggs's Avatar
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    I doubt if you will get any significant free engineering service here. Maybe only some advice that is worth what you're paying for it.

    The picture I get in my mind reading your request is some kind of vertical structure, a tower, that floats in the water upright like a buoy. And when it is removed from the water and placed on a flat surface it still stand upright. Understand this: in the water, the center of the support (better know as the center of buoyancy) will be above the center of gravity of the object. On the ground the center of support (maybe from three legs or the like) will be below the center of gravity.

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