Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Battery powered water boiler

  1. #1
    Associate Engineer
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    1

    Battery powered water boiler

    Hello, I'm trying to build a portable water boiler that boils 50ml of water in around 2 minutes. Can I draw 150 watt out of a lipo battery (say 6s) in that amount of time? do i need a step up converter? what wire gauge do i need to connect the battery to the step up converter if im handling 10Amps? thanks

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    7
    Sorry! No idea on this. I am also interested to get the tips.

  3. #3
    Associate Engineer
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    1
    Great idea.
    I'm also waiting for the update.

  4. #4
    Associate Engineer
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    1
    I dont think lipo battery will help, I have used them in quadcopter and we have to charge them a lot and those were just dc motors but here we are talking about some filament. Why don't you use direct AC supply like electric heaters ??

  5. #5
    Associate Engineer
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    5
    under converter do you mean TRANSFORMER?
    As much i know POWER(W)= Volt(V) * Amp(A) .
    So if you using transformer you can get up the Voltage or AMP but if you rise one , another goes lower , so WATTS will remain same ?
    12V*1AMP=12W
    120V*0.1AMP=12W
    1.2V*10AMP=12W

    But 1 idea is maybe you should try to use super capacitor , load it and let charge flow out from it , maybe you can increase amount of watts that way .
    Problem is if you load super cap, you can fill it with as much VOLTS , as your battery gives out V . Lets say you have 12V battery and CAP can load 100V , it will not be loaded higher than 12 V , so you need to use TRANSFORMER to load it to 100V . problem is if you rise up 12V to 100V (with transformer ) amps go lower and AMPer define how quick capacitor will be loaded. lets say 12V with 1 amp load cap with 10 sec , then 100V with 0.1 amp load it 100 seconds. 10 times you made VOLT higher , but the AMP Went 10times lower and CAPacitor reload time became 10 times bigger.
    So now you can let SUPERCAP charge flow again trough 2nd transformer and you can modify it again if you need to . But WATTS will be higher than before the CAPACITOR.
    Last edited by eta_nool; 05-02-2018 at 03:33 AM.

  6. #6
    Associate Engineer
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    3
    For 150W output, you need 15W*hour battery rated as 10C (~1 A*hour for 6S) or larger, connected to load by AWG20 wires. High-current battery rated as 20C/30C may be better.

  7. #7
    Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Abu Dhabi
    Posts
    10
    Sorry! No idea on this. I am also interested to get the tips.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •