Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Bidirectional bearing wear

  1. #1
    Associate Engineer
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Posts
    3

    Bidirectional bearing wear

    My conceptualized setup:

    I have a radial ball bearing inner race mounted to a shaft that spins at constant rate. The housing of the bearing is mounted to the inner diameter of a cylinder that spins in the same direction as the shaft at half the speed of the shaft. There is also an axial load on the bearing.

    My question:

    Will the bearing wear out quickly and seize? Is this configuration feasible?
    Last edited by server_farm; 01-11-2021 at 12:21 PM.

  2. #2
    Principle Engineer Cragyon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Newark, NJ
    Posts
    279
    If the bearing is sized properly, to the loads, thermal environment, RPM, etc. ... no, the bearing will not "wear out quickly".

  3. #3
    Associate Engineer
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Posts
    3

    Bidirectional bearing wear

    Quote Originally Posted by Cragyon View Post
    If the bearing is sized properly, to the loads, thermal environment, RPM, etc. ... no, the bearing will not "wear out quickly".
    The balls in the bearing will roll in one direction when torque from the spinning shaft is applied. Torque applied to the cylinder in the same direction as the shaft with the bearing housing mounted on the inside diameter of the cylinder will apply a force on the balls tending to move them in the opposite direction. This, to me, implies that the balls will slide instead of roll.

    Will there be an increase in friction inside the ball bearing?

  4. #4
    Associate Engineer
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Posts
    3
    By the way, Thank you for your answer.

  5. #5
    Technical Fellow jboggs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    868
    A picture is worth a thousand words. Post an image of your arrangement and forces. Your last statement just thoroughly confused me.

    If you install a bearing type that is rated for both radial and torque loads, you should be ok. Also, the only speed that matters is the relative speed between the inner and outer races. It doesn't matter what their actual rotational speed is (within reason).

    One other point, you mention torque. If the bearing is applied properly it won't see any torque load.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •