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Thread: Beam Bending or Column Buckling equation?

  1. #1
    Associate Engineer
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    Beam Bending or Column Buckling equation?

    Hello, I am having trouble figuring out if I need to use the beam bending or column buckling formula to calculate the max load a hollow rectangular section can hold. I see plenty of formulas for beam bending with hollow rectangular sections, but mine is not supported at two ends, it is supported along the entire base more like a column. I have also seen column buckling formulas for hollow rectangular cross sections, but they all show the loading axial to the hollow part. Can someone provide feedback on which formula should be used to calculate the max load?
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  2. #2
    Kelly_Bramble's Avatar
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    Feb 2011
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    Bold Springs, GA
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    I think you're wanting to determine when the box beam will collapse or begin yield (crush).

    I haven't any idea however with the known yield of the base material a load design that is 1/2 of that one could half argue that you have a FOS 2. Which I know is mostly not correct.

    With testing one could create an estimated typical yield crush load..

    Engineers Edge does have the following calculator where one could set the foundation deflection to a very low # (.0001) and then determine the Moment, shear and deflection of the beam.

    Beam with Distributed Loading on Elastic Foundation Calculator and Equations

  3. #3
    Associate Engineer
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    Jul 2022
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    Hi Kelly,

    Sorry, but I am not following what you're trying to say.

    I think of "crush load" in the same category as buckling (just short vs long column). But then in the next section you say to measure beam deflection. This is exactly the question I'm trying to answer: should I be using the column buckling or beam deflection equation?

    Thanks!

  4. #4
    Engineer
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    Mar 2011
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    Crush and compression are the same - yield or buckling are different concepts.

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