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Thread: question on determining torque

  1. #1
    Associate Engineer
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    Apr 2012
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    question on determining torque

    I do not have the socket size necessary to apply proper torque to a bolt

    does anyone know a link with a table for the number of turns needed that equal a specific torque?

    ie, tighten nut, then turn 1 1/2 turns to equal 250 lb/ft of torque for a 1/2-20 bolt...

    Does anyone have a MARKS or Machinery's Handbook and know what page that is on? Both of them bring me to motor starting torque!

  2. #2
    Administrator Kelly Bramble's Avatar
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    I'm not sure such data is in Machinery's... Moreover, I think the resultant torque is not that predictable, though it may not matter.

    Can you adapt a torque wrench to a hand wrench or crows-foot? Check the following:

    http://www.engineersedge.com/manufac...e_wrench_1.htm

    http://www.engineersedge.com/manufac...e_wrench_2.htm

  3. #3
    Technical Fellow
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    Hi Jim,

    There are way too many variables to rely on just the number of turns.
    The material the bolt is made of.
    The material being tightened down.
    Gaskets involved.
    Crush washers involved.
    Spring or star washers involved.

    You could get a very rough idea by using the pitch (helix angle) of the bolt and calculating a given turning force will be generated, but there are again too many variables for that to be useful.

    Go to your local auto-parts-store and rent or borrow the correct tools or suffer the consequences of guesswork. My local Autozone ***** a lot of stuff. You have to leave a deposit but the credit it back when you return stuff.

  4. #4
    Associate Engineer
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    Apr 2012
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    Took me a while to get back to this, but, we found the right socket

    Thanks for any help

  5. #5
    Associate Engineer
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    Apr 2012
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    Another possible solution is to buy torque bolts. they have a black/red indicator on them that changes when the torque is reached. This is, of course, if you want to spend a lot of money on a simple bolt.

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