Engineering, Design and Research News

Submit Your News Article Here!

Engineering Research News!
Pages: << 13 14 15 [16] 17 18 19 >>

Liquid-crystal antenna helps stable satellite-broadcast reception
Satellite-television reception and stable Internet links to earth satellites have thus far demanded employment of stationary antennae. However, researcher has developed a space-saving, inexpensive, and extremely rapidly, electronically redirectable antenna that should allow automobiles, ships, and aircraft to maintain stable radiocommunications with earth satellites.
World-first 300mm-fab self-assembly line
Imec announces the successful implementation of the world first 300mm fab-compatible Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) process line all-under-one-roof in imec's 300mm cleanroom fab.
A robot that can sketch your portrait
An industrial robot as artist? From March 6-10, 2012, researchers will be presenting what may at first seem to be a contradiction at CeBIT in Hanover, Germany (Hall 9, Stand E08). There, interested visitors can view the metal painter in action and can even have it sketch their own faces.
Smallest room-temperature nanolaser
A team of University of California, San Diego researchers has built the smallest room-temperature nanolaser to date, as well as an even more startling device: a highly efficient, "thresholdless" laser that funnels all its photons into lasing, without any waste.
MRI used to study communication within the brain
Innovative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques that can measure changes in the microstructure of the white matter likely to affect brain function and the ability of different regions of the brain to communicate.
Tiny vibrating "microcantilevers" improve sensor performance
Researchers have learned how to improve the performance of sensors that use tiny vibrating "microcantilevers," like the one pictured here, to detect chemical and biological agents for applications from national security to food processing. (Vijay Kumar, Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University.
Welding nanowires with light
At the nano level, researchers at Stanford have discovered a new way to weld together meshes of tiny wires. Their work could lead to innovative electronics and solar applications. To succeed, they called upon plasmonics.
Orthopedic implants "dip-coated" aids in bone repair
When William Murphy works with some of the most powerful tools in biology, he thinks about making tools that can fit together. These constructions sound a bit like socket wrenches, which can be assembled to turn a half-inch nut in tight quarters, or to loosen a rusted-tight one-inch bolt using a very persuasive lever.
Open-source fluid dynamics design software
Stanford University Unstructured (SU2) is an open-source software package that gives advanced engineering students a crucial leg up on the time-consuming process of writing their own code to optimize aerospace designs - offering for free what commercial applications command thousands of dollars to do.
High-speed electronics in optical fibers
Scientists at the University of Southampton, in collaboration with Penn State University have, for the first time, embedded the high level of performance normally associated with chip-based semiconductors into an optical fibre, creating high-speed optoelectronic function.

Pages: << 13 14 15 [16] 17 18 19 >>


Contribute Article
Spider Optimizer

© Copyright 2000 - 2017, by Engineers Edge, LLC www.engineersedge.com
All rights reserved
Disclaimer | Feedback | Advertising | Contact