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Boom Lift Question
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Posted by: Sheldon

01/25/2004, 13:38:15

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I'm designing a lift for inspection of electricity poles. It has to be mounted onto a 3 Ton truck tray. I intend to use a telescoping arrangement to achieve the maximum operating height of 35 feet. the height when stowed should be 10 feet. It has to swivel through 3 degrees of freedom 180 degrees horizontally. I was wondering if anyone has any suggestions on what to use to accomplish this.

Also does anyone know any good websites with  information on hydraulic cylinders and motors for such use as above.







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Re:Boom Lift
Re: Boom Lift -- Sheldon Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: RandyKimball
Barney
01/25/2004, 18:49:20

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May I suggest you design a serious miniature one with full working actions to gain experience and to work out the buggs.
There are several catalogs with hydraulic motors, cylinders, pumps, and valving available. They often contain charts in the back to help in selections. A working miniature would be much easer to handle, I've repaired such devices and the, by far, toughest part is the massive sizes and weighs you must handle. Make your mistakes first in a miniature. I work with hydraulics and there is no way I would undertake this project without building a working miniature first.

Next,I'm confused, are you asking with which software to design or with what to use to build the project with. There are many issues to consider before you even begin to design the project. How much weight to lift, how fast, how often, is it to hold a person, persons, controled remotely, dual controled, balance, leverage, drift, electrical conductivity, strength and durability of the wear points, and on and on?
First if it holds a person you must use a PE for the design or get one to sign of on the design, by law in most places.
I'm not being negative, you may know full well what you are doing. If not, for your sake, I just want you to realize what you are getting into.

By the question you ask, it leaves me wondering if you have considered all the parameters envolved. In the hydraulics alone you could easily design a system that won't work or one that becomes a catapult at great expense in time and resources unless you know what your are doing. This project has serious safety issues to consider and may fall under regulations, especially if you are thinking of designing it for public commercial usage.

BUT, a working miniature should solve all your questions and be a heck of a powerful design tool! By the time you have it built you will know the "how to" questions in your mind.

-randy-




The worst suggestion of you lifetime may be the catalyst to the grandest idea of the century, never let suggestions go unsaid nor fail to listen to them.


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Re: Re:Boom Lift
Re: Re:Boom Lift -- RandyKimball Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Sheldon

01/27/2004, 19:22:34

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Thanks alot Randy for the considerations.

I would not have to worry about getting the design signed off or anything like that. I'm a mechanical engineering student at the University of the West Indies. This is one of our design proects, no building involved.

I've already started looking at some of the considerations you've posted, ie speed weight etc. The design is to be for a two man work crew with tools for a total weight of 700lb excluding bucket.

I'm exploring Parkers' hydraulic components as possible options. Do you have any recommendations?







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Re: Re:Boom Lift Smile
Re: Re: Re:Boom Lift -- Sheldon Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: rpatoh

02/23/2004, 18:46:10

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Parker is a very good choice...






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Re: Re:Boom Lift
Re: Re:Boom Lift -- RandyKimball Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Sheldon

01/27/2004, 19:21:00

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Removed





Modified by Administrator at Sat, Jan 31, 2004, 17:02:04

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Re: Boom Lift
Re: Re: Re:Boom Lift -- Sheldon Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: RandyKimball
Barney
01/28/2004, 20:37:34

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OK, kool,
Then the next thing to do is visit a bearing supply (now days these often supply all the things you would need). In the back they will have stacks of vendor books filled with the parts and info you need for FREE (the books [catalogs] for free). If your first bearing house (supply) doesn't have what you need, try another. Just explain and ask. They should have no problem giving you the catalogs as they often need to toss them when new updated versions come in anyway. They cost them nothing, they'll likely invite you back to pick out what you want.
Good luck!
-randy-



The worst suggestion of you lifetime may be the catalyst to the grandest idea of the century, never let suggestions go unsaid nor fail to listen to them.

Modified by RandyKimball at Sun, Feb 01, 2004, 10:27:52

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