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Newbie with injection molding
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Posted by: Flemm

05/08/2005, 05:33:51

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First of all- thank you for a great forum!

For a school project im designing two parts for injection molding, but I have no experience with this at all and I have some questions. Is it okay to have some variations in wall thickness (smallest 2 mm and largest 10 mm? or is this way to much).. the parts need to have inserts or threaded holes so they can me mounted together.

http://uk.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/flemm_sorgen/detail?.dir=3211&.dnm=2af4.jpg&.src=ph

http://uk.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/flemm_sorgen/detail?.dir=3211&.dnm=4cab.jpg&.src=ph

These pictures show my first attempt for the design(I have not drawn any radiuses on the corners on these pictures, but will chamfer them later). Please let me know if you see how this design can be improved for injection molding. Any help is appreciated- thanks!

industrial design student







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Re: Newbie with injection molding
Re: Newbie with injection molding -- Flemm Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: randykimball
Barney
05/08/2005, 10:38:35

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Excellent start!!!! ... nice job!

It is a learned art form, but two pieces of advice.

1. Think about liquid plastic flow paterns.
a. places for the plastic to sprue to
b. places for the plastic to spru flow from

2. Where possible always strive to design strength in webs and save plastic material. This also improves production by reducing flash time. So it is a "win win" design goal.

I'm not saying you haven't done so, just to always do so.
Also.. yes, radii are vital to material flow. Sharp corners, when not necessary, can induce voids, ... besides a nice use of radii will make a product look much more professional and quality.

I don't have a lot of experience in this area but there you have my two cents worth.

-randy-




The worst suggestion of your lifetime may be the catalyst to the grandest idea of the century, never let suggestions go unsaid nor fail to listen to them.


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