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Metal Foam Strength
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Posted by: kvkmurty

07/31/2005, 17:51:21

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Do anyone has an idea of how strong metal/copper foams can behave?
I want to use metal foam as a tension member that should hold a metal plate in place against a normal pressure. I must mention there is pressure everywhere inside the foam too.
Any knowledge would be highly appreciated.
Thanks.






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Re: Metal Foam Strength
Re: Metal Foam Strength -- kvkmurty Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: kelly_bramble Administrator

07/31/2005, 22:34:31

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Material performance and specifications should be available from the material manufacturer. I would search the web to find a supplier/manufacturer and ask them for engineering data on the material.






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Re: Metal Foam Strength
Re: Re: Metal Foam Strength -- kelly_bramble Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: kvkmurty

08/01/2005, 12:07:49

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I am sorry. My wording is giving a wrong interpretation of what I am trying to do.

I have the values for foam strength and other properties. But I am looking for a procedure to analyze the foam capability for this configuration - I have a plate that must remain exactly at a particular location. There is normal pressure acting on the plate everywhere. I am trying to secure it in its position by attaching/bonding a metal foam to it (assume the use of foam is inevitable i.e, no other strength member can be fitted into the configuration/space that I have) on the pressure side. Now I have a problem with numerical simulation of this configuration, the key issue being modeling the foam against tension. If anybody has any experience with a similar kind of problem, I would be very grateful for their help. Thanks again.







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Re: Metal Foam Strength Smile
Re: Re: Metal Foam Strength -- kvkmurty Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Gary Kemp

08/01/2005, 15:46:51

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Would a honeycomb structure fit in your envelope?






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Re: Metal Foam Strength
Re: Re: Metal Foam Strength -- Gary Kemp Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: kvkmurty

08/02/2005, 18:45:10

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Yes, the foam can have any kind of structure. I am having a problem of modeling the highly porous metal foam and finding the stress developed in it.
Thanks again.






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Re: Metal Foam Strength Smile
Re: Re: Metal Foam Strength -- kvkmurty Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Gary Kemp

08/03/2005, 18:58:13

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Now you have me curious as to whether foam in tension can actually be consistently modeled at all. If foam is considered to be similar to a porous material then the cell walls would be subjected to many combined loads.

Honeycomb could be modeled with all of the cell walls in tension which could be predictable.

The only approach I can imagine for foam would be some kind of statistical shot maybe supported with testing. If you find a solution I hope you share it with us.
Gary







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Re: Metal Foam Strength
Re: Re: Metal Foam Strength -- Gary Kemp Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: kelly_bramble

08/03/2005, 22:01:19

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Yes, I just noticed "Tension" in the original question. I agree that one should apply the loads for characterization, this is probably the quickest way to estimate the performance. If the foam must absorb all of the tension loading, I can't help but wonder if it will respond simular to a spring with axial tension applied. Let us all know!





Modified by kelly_bramble at Wed, Aug 03, 2005, 22:07:17

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Re: Metal Foam Strength Smile
Re: Re: Metal Foam Strength -- kelly_bramble Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: gary kemp

08/04/2005, 18:26:51

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I like the spring approach. I think if ever a quatified approch evolves it will be springlike in nature. This would be a fun analysis and I am jealous.

Please keep us posted.
Gary







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