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Intake/Exhaust manifold Idea
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Posted by: matin

06/21/2006, 07:11:29

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We have in our facility Wartsila 18SW 38 series engine.I think there is a design flaw.Well the exhaust manifold sits right on top of intake manifold usually the temperatures of exhaust manifold are in the range of 480 to 500C and of intake manifold between 55 and 60 C .I was thinking of insulating the exhaust manifold because I think there must be some heat transfer taking place between the two passages and that also help to increase the intake manifold temperatures and that causes the exhaust temperatures to go up a little bit If I insulate the exhaust manifold is there any chance of restricting some heat transfer??????????????????







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Re: Intake/Exhaust manifold
Re: Intake/Exhaust manifold -- matin Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: randykimball
Barney
06/21/2006, 20:55:53

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I would NOT do anything to prevent the exhaust manifold from venting as much heat as possible... nor to restrict that BTU escape an any way. Most of the exchange of air at the exhaust manifold most likely is provided by rising air up through the intake manifold. Heated air rises.




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Re: Re: Intake/Exhaust manifold Idea
Re: Re: Intake/Exhaust manifold -- randykimball Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: matin

06/22/2006, 04:04:24

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I did not get it can you please elaborate?????????????????







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Re: Re: Re: Intake/Exhaust manifold
Re: Re: Re: Intake/Exhaust manifold -- matin Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: JWMotorsports

06/28/2006, 11:29:33

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Insulating the exhaust manifold will help lower the intake temps which in most cases help generate more HP and torque output as long as you have the proper fuel system to accomodate the increased air flow. By holding heat in the exhaust manifold it will also speed up the exhaust flow velocity and aid in generating a higher VE (Volumetric Efficiency). Lowering air intake temps increases the density of the air allowing the engine to flow air higher volume of oxygen through the same given area at "x" velocity. The things you have to watch are the cylinder head temp at the combustion chamber (can be compensated hotter or colder to a small degree with spark plug heat range, unless it is a diesl engine). Your best bet is to ceramic coat both the intake and exhaust manifolds. The intake manifold flange is the most important component to coat to prevent thermal transfer from the cylinder head to the intake manifold which will assist in lowering intake temperatures and increasing VE. The exhaust can be ceramic coated, thermal wrapped, or both. This will lower radiant heat further lowering air intake temps while increasing exhaust velocity further increasing the engines VE. Other things you can do are ceramic coat the cylinder heads (ports and combustion chambers) and pistons. This keeps the heat and thermal energy where it is needed most, also further yet increases the engines VE. You'll need to monitor both your air/fuel ratios in the exhaust and the exhaust temperatures to tune the engine to its peak efficiency. I don't recommend lowering the coolant temperature of a combustion engine below 170*F as then it is more difficult to get a good consistant flame front for combustion. There are alot of anit friction coatings and reflective silica aluminum skined heat barriers out there. [removed] Oil Lubricants also make a big differance and add a lot of protection and antiwear!







Modified by Administrator at Wed, Jun 28, 2006, 11:33:56


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