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Building a Wine Press - Safety concerns for force transfer Awesome
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Posted by: purduephotog

09/08/2006, 23:14:25

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Good Evening-
I've been trying to design a wine press but am concerned I may fail due to my poor design and the relatively extreme forces involved.

Background follows:

To see an example of a type of press I'm considering, please see this:
http://www.dog.itshisworld.com/gpage1.html

For my press I had intended to place the hydraulic cylinder beneath the compression chamber- eliminating the chance of contamination. Everything else will be hardwood- or possibly (fir, pine) depending on size.

I would like to 'rest' the hydraulic jack on two pieces of angle iron that are then braced with 2x6 or 2x8. They form the floor of the wine press, and might possibly have a small 'filler' board to keep them from shifting. I expect to use several carriage bolts to hold this angle-iron reinforced structure together. I have access to a OxyAcetylene setup but had not intended to use it for this design.

This floor beam would transfer the force to a pair (4x) of vertical beams on either side. A small filler and stop would separate the two vertical beams. As before, a carriage bolt or two would be used to keep the beams in alignment with each other. These could be made out of laminated plywood (3 to 4" thick) or 4" post beams.

The top of the press would have either one, two, or three 2x8 or 2x12's to transfer the force to the follower. Square stock (spaced with holes- I can't recall what it's called) would be set with a pin to allow me to drop the press further and further down as the pomace was drained of juice.

I was thinking of making the follower (the piece that covers the pomace/must) from simple 2x3/4 plywood and a steel cup to help distribute the force.

That's the background. My concerns are bracing the 20 ton jack properly and preventing the entire press from disintegrating. I do not expect to exceed 6 tons of force with this design as that would exceed 100 PSI on the pomace, and I'm told bad things begin to happen to grape seeds around there.

Given that the pot is 12" in diameter and I'd like to upgrade to at least 18" in the future, that requires a minimum floor beam length of 30" + vertical beam thickness, or about 40" total.

How does one go about calculating the yield strength of angle iron in this case- am I over engineering the bottom? Are my concerns justified?

I have been using this as a source of information:
http://www.auf.asn.au/scratchbuilder/wood_strength_values.html

I'm afraid to admit it but I'm a ChemEng/Chem, although it's been so long since I took my materials courses that I don't even know where to begin.

Thanks in advance for any insights you may have-

Jason







Modified by Administrator at Sat, Sep 09, 2006, 08:29:21


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: Building a Wine Press - Safety concerns for force transfer
: Building a Wine Press - Safety concerns for force transfer -- purduephotog Post Reply Top of thread Engineering Forum
Posted by: PaulThoma

08/30/2009, 16:43:14

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Hello,

Did you get any answer to this post?
I'm designing my own press and am considering a similar design, [inverted-hydraulic cylinder below pomace].

Was hoping to use hardwoods, mostly red oak and maple, both of which I have in abundance in large dimensions, and would love to see some sketches of your design, including variations from the source design and what you've learned.








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: : Building a Wine Press - Safety concerns for force transfer
: : Building a Wine Press - Safety concerns for force transfer -- PaulThoma Post Reply Top of thread Engineering Forum
Posted by: purduephotog

08/30/2009, 21:40:44

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Nope- never got an answer- but yours was the first response that triggered.

I ended up picking up a used press- it's in bad shape as the lower bar member is cracked- but I grossly over-estimated the force required to compress grape pomace- its easier to just have a larger basket under smaller force than it is to have a tall basket with lots of force. I don't think I could supply over 2 tons of force on the grape pomace so it didn't matter when I crushed them.

I'm still interested- have lots of 'bed frame' material picked up from the side of the road to reinforce the winepress although I did lose access to the mill- so oxy/mig is my limit.








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: Building a Wine Press - Safety concerns for force transfer -- purduephotog Post Reply Top of thread Engineering Forum
Posted by: mattcalcio2

11/13/2008, 11:13:09

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Jason,

I see you posted a while ago, but I am engaged a similar project currently. I am a mechanical engineer and could help you with the force transfer calculations. A good reference book would be shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design. Any leads would be great. Would like to chat.

Matt
mattcalcio2@aol.com








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