Engineers Edge
Design of o-Ring Sad
Post Reply   Forum
Posted by: akkrupal

02/23/2007, 05:31:59

Author Profile
eMail author
Edit

Can anybody help me in design of a O-ring gasket and corresponing Groove







Post Reply
Tell a Friend (must be logged in)
Alert Admin About Post
View All   | Next |

Replies to this message

Re: Design of o-Ring
Re: Design of o-Ring -- akkrupal Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Marky

02/23/2007, 07:54:19

Author Profile
eMail author
Edit

Sure....but you can find everything you need in the engineering area here or on the Parker site.

If it's supermega custom please fill us in on the details.








Post Reply
Tell a Friend (must be logged in)
Alert Admin About Post
Where am I? Original Top of thread | |
Re: Re: Design of o-Ring
Re: Re: Design of o-Ring -- Marky Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Kelly Bramble

02/23/2007, 08:39:31

Author Profile
eMail author
Edit

I agree with Marky, if Engineers Edge does not have enough o-ring design data, go to Parker Oring and download thier design manual. Try very-very-very hard to pick a standard size o-ring and material. Design too the suggested o-ring gland given. If you have more questions, contact a o-ring engineer at parker or any o-ring manufacturer. They can help you pick the right material as well.

Custom o-rings will require design and custom tooling costs. Tooling can be anywhere from $2000 - $15,000 USD plus setup costs for manufacturing.

No point in inventing a o-ring..








Post Reply
Tell a Friend (must be logged in)
Alert Admin About Post
Where am I? Original Top of thread | |
Re: Re: Re: Design of o-Ring
Re: Re: Re: Design of o-Ring -- Kelly Bramble Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: randykimball
Barney
02/25/2007, 09:30:52

Author Profile
eMail author
Edit

When data is not available a general machine guide line often used for machining an o-ring groove between two flat surfaces is:

Machine the groove depth to 75% to 85% of the o-ring thickness.
Machine the groove volume to be 115% of the o-ring volume. Select the outside and inside diameters of the groove to be evenly larger and smaller than the diameters of the o-ring (this won't be much).

This allows the o-ring to extrude towards the exit seam in the assembly groove where it will force a seal because it can not be extrudded through the seam. It is the hydraulic forces acting on the o-ring trying to force it out the seam that effects a seal in surface to surface applications.

Frequenty, thinking that an o-ring should be in a compression fit, the mistake is made of machining the groove to a volume less than the o-ring volume. This makes surface to surface contact of the two parts nearly impossible to achieve. In a high pressure situation the result is that the o-ring material extrudes into the not metal to metal fit seam, this damages the o-ring profile, and the seal eventually fails, and often causes an errosion or compression deformation of material at the site which additionally damages the machined parts to a point that the reinstallation of new o-rings fails almost instantly.





The worst suggestion of your lifetime may be the catalyst to the grandest idea of the century, never let suggestions go unsaid nor fail to listen to them.

Modified by randykimball at Sun, Feb 25, 2007, 09:43:04


Post Reply
Tell a Friend (must be logged in)
Alert Admin About Post
Where am I? Original Top of thread | |
Re: Re: Re: Re: Design of o-Ring
Re: Re: Re: Re: Design of o-Ring -- randykimball Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: alireza59

03/03/2007, 05:21:32

Author Profile
eMail author
Edit

Simrit Co. has a software that can help you in O-ring design.







Post Reply
Tell a Friend (must be logged in)
Alert Admin About Post
Where am I? Original Top of thread

Powered by Engineers Edge

© Copyright 2000 - 2019, by Engineers Edge, LLC All rights reserved.  Disclaimer