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Thread: "frame" --- portal and gable rigid plane frame analysis

  1. #1
    Principle Engineer Cragyon's Avatar
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    "frame" --- portal and gable rigid plane frame analysis

    1. This program uses the "stiffness matrix" method of analysis and four (4) following basic analysis assumptions:
    a. Members must be of constant cross section (E and I are constant for entire length).
    b. Deflections must not significantly alter the geometry of the problem.
    c. Stress must remain within the "elastic" region.
    d. Since this is a "first-order", linear analysis, the effects of "P-delta" and shear deformation are not included.
    (However, significant effects due to shear deformation are limited to very short and deep members.)
    2. Additional assumptions and features are as follows:
    a. Frame support joints may each be either fixed or pinned.
    b. Frame support joints may be at different levels (elevations).
    c. Columns must be vertical (cannot be sloped).
    c. For a portal frame, the top (roof) member may be flat or sloped in either direction.
    3. A vertical load, horizontal load, and externally moment may be applied to any of the joints of the frame. These
    joint loads are to be applied in "global" axes directions. Note: Joint loads applied directly at supports are merely
    added directly to support reactions and are not reflected in member end force values.
    4. On any individual member, this program will handle up to five (5) full uniform, partial uniform, triangular, or
    trapezoidal loads, up to ten (10) point loads, and up to four (4) externally applied moments. For vertical members,
    distributed loads and point loads are input in a "X-Global" sence of direction. For flat or sloped top (roof)
    members, distributed loads may be applied global over actual member length or applied global over the
    "projected" member length. Program designations are "Y-Global", "Y-Projected", "X-Global", and "X-Projected".
    For a flat top (roof) member of a portal frame, "Y-Global" and "Y-Projected" loads produce the same results.
    Uniformly distributed gravity (dead or live) load would be an example of a "Y-Global" distributed load on a sloped
    top (roof) member, while lateral uniformly distributed wind load on sloped top (roof) member would be an
    example of an "X-Projected" distributed load. A uniformly distributed load such as wind suction perpendicular
    (normal) to a sloped top (roof) member must be resolved into Y-Global and X-Global component values by user.
    5. This program will calculate the member end reactions, the member end forces (axial, shear, and moment),
    the member maximum positive and negative moments (if applicable), and the joint displacements.
    The calculated values for the maximum moments are determined from dividing the member into fifty (50)
    equal segments with fifty-one (51) points, and including all of the point load and applied moment locations as
    well. (Note: the actual point of maximum moment occurs where the shear = 0, or passes through zero.)
    6. The user is also given the ability to select an AISC W, S, C, MC, or HSS (rectangular tube) shape to aide in
    obtaining the required moment of inertia for input. (This facility is located off to the right of the main page.)
    7. This program contains numerous “comment boxes” which contain a wide variety of information including
    explanations of input or output items, equations used, data tables, etc. (Note: presence of a “comment box”
    is denoted by a “red triangle” in the upper right-hand corner of a cell. Merely move the mouse pointer to the
    desired cell to view the contents of that particular "comment box".)

    http://www.engineersedge.com/excel_c...ysis_13481.htm
    Last edited by Kelly Bramble; 11-03-2015 at 03:30 PM.

  2. #2
    Lead Engineer Cake of Doom's Avatar
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    Good work! Makes me wish I'd spent more time learning to use Excel. A lot of "bread and butter" stuff would be so much easier.

  3. #3
    Principle Engineer Cragyon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cake of Doom View Post
    Good work! Makes me wish I'd spent more time learning to use Excel. A lot of "bread and butter" stuff would be so much easier.

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