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Thread: rotary switch mount

  1. #1
    Associate Engineer
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    rotary switch mount

    Hello everyone! Hope I am posting in the right forum section.
    I am building a custom synthesizer enclosure and have no idea how to mount this rotary switch:

    What hole dimension should I drill and how to deal with that "legs"? Also got no idea what is the purpose of that little ledge:



    Any help much appreciated!
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  2. #2
    Technical Fellow jboggs's Avatar
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    See the diagram in the lower left of the picture you posted? it shows a 2.05mm hole with a 2.1mm wide keyway. That's the hole size you drill. The "little ledge" you asked about is the key that fits in that keyway. Its purpose is to make sure your switch is properly aligned the way you want it.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jboggs View Post
    See the diagram in the lower left of the picture you posted? it shows a 2.05mm hole with a 2.1mm wide keyway. That's the hole size you drill. The "little ledge" you asked about is the key that fits in that keyway. Its purpose is to make sure your switch is properly aligned the way you want it.
    Thanks for reply!
    Is is possible to drill a hole without that keyway? Is it mandatory, or I will be fine without it?

    Cheers!

  4. #4
    Administrator Kelly Bramble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jboggs View Post
    See the diagram in the lower left of the picture you posted? it shows a 2.05mm hole with a 2.1mm wide keyway. That's the hole size you drill. The "little ledge" you asked about is the key that fits in that keyway. Its purpose is to make sure your switch is properly aligned the way you want it.
    Sheet metal punched hole feature.. There should also be a min/max panel thickness included with the switch.
    Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kelly Bramble View Post
    Sheet metal punched hole feature.. There should also be a min/max panel thickness included with the switch.
    nope, no any additional information provided regarding the sheet metal min/max thikness :(
    here is the product page:
    Last edited by Kelly Bramble; 12-07-2015 at 08:07 AM.

  6. #6
    Administrator Kelly Bramble's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilya View Post
    nope, no any additional information provided regarding the sheet metal min/max thikness :(
    here is the product page:
    That was a vendor webpage.. Go directly to the manufacturer and ask for panel thickness.

    If you can't get the information - design around the stepped lock/snap in features. Probably 4 - 3 mm sheetmetal.
    Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.

  7. #7
    Technical Fellow jboggs's Avatar
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    Yes, you can drill the hole without the keyway. Then you will have to either add the keyway manually or remove the key from the switch body. Without one of those the switch will not fit thru your hole.

  8. #8
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    Removing the key and its keyway from the panel is not a good idea. The snap tabs that retain the switch do not have a enough friction pressure to keep the switch from rotating in the hole and over time it can turn sideways or upside down simply by by being pushed sideways while being actuated. I have seen these type of switches rotate out of alignment due to nothing more than the tension on one of the connecting wires. As a prior custom panel and electronics enclosure manufacturer I can definitely state that there are few things more frustrating to an operator than a switch that will not stay in it desired orientation.

    Also, although the diagram indicates a fairly wide range of panel thickness for the panel grips; to be safe, you should definitely check with the switch manufacturer about the panel thickness limit.

    Just as a point of clarification for your future discussions this type of switch is generally known as a "toggle switch" rather than a rotary switch.

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