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Murphy bed mechanism Question
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Posted by: watw1000

04/27/2006, 20:57:17

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We are remodeling and plan to build a Murphy bed along a wall. We looked at prepackaged kits (costly) and are brainstorming to come up with a mechanism to raise/lower bed. Most designs have the bed balanced on a horizontal bar. The bottom of the bed platform is faced with a cabinet or panel that becomes a decorative element when the bed folds into the wall. Would a garage door opener installed vertically on the wall behind the bed work? It would have the benefit of remote control. If aircraft cable is attached to the bottom corners of the head of the bed, the bed would raise with mattress facing out. Not ideal. If we used a spring piston devise (probably available at junkyard) the mechanism would be exposed and unsightly when bed is lowered. So far, we have done all the remodeling work, electrical, drywall, plumbing, tiling, etc, but are stumped on this one.






Modified by Administrator at Thu, Apr 27, 2006, 21:19:29


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Re: Murphy bed mechanism
Re: Murphy bed mechanism -- watw1000 Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Kelly_Bramble

05/05/2006, 08:45:10

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A simple weight mechanism should do the trick. To determine the proper weight, just wait until you have installed the bed and keep adding weight until you get the action you need.

You could substitute the weight mechanism with a motor / driving a drum to capture the cable. If you use a power mechanism, consider limit switches and a controller which is remote from the bed.


murphy_bed.gif (4798 bytes)  





Modified by Kelly_Bramble at Fri, May 05, 2006, 08:49:06


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Re: Murphy bed mechanism
Re: Murphy bed mechanism -- watw1000 Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: Marky

05/05/2006, 07:46:10

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IS THIS TIM THE TOOLMAN TAYLOR!!! MORE POWER!!! AR, AR AR!!!Somebody could get hurt. Using a remote control garage door opener wouldn't be the best thing.

What would happen if the radio frequency of your opener got mixed in with someone elses or a cell phone set it off. You'll find your guests laying in the new wall.

"MOM!! Grandma and Grandpa are stuck in the wall again because Mr. Wilson next door opened his garage".

Spend the money on the kit or visit some the do it yourself websites..bobvila.com, hgtv.com etc....

Good Luck!!!








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Re: Re: Murphy bed mechanism
Re: Re: Murphy bed mechanism -- Marky Post Reply Top of thread Forum
Posted by: randykimball
Barney
05/06/2006, 08:41:20

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A murphy bed does not have to be powered.

Think through this with me.

Let's say your bed is 1 foot thick. You would need a cabinet about 18" thick. If your pivot pin and bushing are about 14" inches from the head end and at the bottom of the bed you could lift the bed easily enough and when up, it stays up because almost all the weight is behind the pin in the cabinet. Now if you add weight to the head (board) high (remember the head board must clear the 18" radius) this will add counter weight and make the bed lower eaiser and stay up better. Then the base becomes the wall when stored and becomes the stop as to how well it fits against the wall. You would want to make the frame light but strong and the base match the wall in texture and appearance but be light of weight. Remember you need some kind of head board to hold the bedding material in the vertical position. Now you have designed with KISS... keep it simple, stupid. Less will ever go wrong... after all this IS a Murphy bed... and has roots as to where we get the saying.

As for powered murphys, try to put a device inside the cabinet that powers the shaft the bed pivots on. This gets all devices out of sight but requires more engineering skills.





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Modified by randykimball at Sat, May 06, 2006, 08:47:55


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