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Thread: Mathematically proving "can't push on a rope"

  1. #1
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    Mathematically proving "can't push on a rope"

    I know intuitively that if i hold a roll of rope in front of me and have one end of the rope draped over a pulley above my head, that if I try to push the rope over the pulley by unspooling the rope, it won't work because I can't push on a rope, but what is the math behind it? Is there a speed that the pulley can spin that will draw up the rope?

  2. #2
    Administrator Kelly Bramble's Avatar
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    Google "Newtons laws of Gravity"
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  3. #3
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    The Reason behind the phenomena is friction, the Newtons law of gravity said that every object is experiencing the Gravitation Force, push and pull and other forces

  4. #4
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    I see this problem similar to Euler's column buckling problem with a low modulus and high slenderness ratio.

  5. #5
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    Fluids are pushed all of the time. Ever seen a fire hose?

  6. #6
    Administrator Kelly Bramble's Avatar
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    I suppose that Column Theory or Euler's formula could be used.. Both ends would be treated as pinned?


    https://www.engineersedge.com/column...lumn_ideal.htm
    Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.

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