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Casting Manufacturing Process Comparison Table Chart

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The following table compares casting manufacturing processes by advantages, disadvantagesand recommended application.

Casting Processes - see Casting Definitions, General Design Guidelines

Casting Process Advantages Disadvantages   Recommended Application
Sand

More Information:

Sand Cast Design Guidelines

Casting Rib Design

General Design Guidelines

 

  • Least Expensive in small quantities (less than 100)

  • Ferrous and non- ferrous metals may be cast

  • Possible to cast very large parts.

  • Least expensive tooling

  • Dimensional accuracy inferior to other processes, requires larger tolerances
  • Castings usually exceed calculated weight
  • Surface finish of ferrous castings usually exceeds 125 RMS 
  • Use when strength/weight ratio permits
  • Tolerances, surface finish and low machining cost does not warrant a more expensive process

Permanent and
Semi-permanent Mold

More Information:

Casting Rib Design

General Design Guidelines

  • Less expensive than Investment or Die Castings
  • Dimensional Tolerances closer than Sand Castings
  • Castings are dense and pressure tight
  • Only non-ferrous metals may be cast by this process
  • Less competitive with Sand Cast process when three or more sand cores are required
  • Higher tooling cost than Sand Cast
  • Use when process recommended for parts subjected to hydrostatic pressure
  • Ideal for parts having low profile, no cores and quantities in excess of 300
Plaster Cast

More Information:

Casting Rib Design

General Design Guidelines

  • Smooth "As Cast" finish (25 RMS)
  • Closer dimensional tolerance than Sand Cast
  • Intricate shapes and fine details including thinner "As Cast" walls are possible
  • Large parts cost less to cast than by Investment process
  • More costly than Sand or Permanent Mold-Casting
  • Limited number of sources
  • Requires minimum of 1 deg. draft
Use when parts require smooth "As Cast" surface finish and closer tolerances than possible with Sand or Permanent Mold Processes
Investment Cast

More Information:

Investment Casting Using Stereolithgraphy

Casting Rib Design

General Design Guidelines

 

  • Close dimensional tolerance
  • Complex shape, fine detail, intricate core sections and thin walls are possible
  • Ferrous and non-ferrous metals may be cast
  •  "As-Cast" finish (64 - 125 RMS)
  • Costs are higher than Sand, Permanent Mold or Plaster process Castings
  • Use when Complexity precludes use of Sand or Permanent Mold Castings
  • The process cost is justified through savings in machining or brazing
  • Weight savings justifies increased cost
Die Cast

More Information:

Casting Rib Design

General Design Guidelines

  • Good dimensional tolerances are possible
  • Excellent part-part dimensional consistency
  • Parts require a minimal post machining
  • Economical only in very large quantities due to high tool cost
  • Not recommended for hydrostatic pressure applications
  • For Castings where penetrant (die) or radiographic inspection are not required.
  • Difficult to guarantee minimum mechanical properties
  • Use when quantity of parts justifies the high tooling cost
  • Parts are not structural and are subjected to hydrostatic pressure

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