Related Resources: Design and Engineering General

Design Bolted and Riveted Joints

Guide to Design Criteria for Bolted and Riveted Joints

Related:

This resource requires a Premium Membership

Open: Guide to Design Criteria for Bolted and Riveted Joints

This book provides a state-of-the-art summary of the experimental and theoretical studies undertaken to provide an understanding of the behavior and strength of riveted and bolted structural joints. Design criteria have been developed on the basis of this information and should be beneficial to designers, teachers, students, and specification writing bodies.

The book is intended to provide a comprehensive source of information on bolted and riveted structural joints as well as an explanation of their behavior under various load conditions. Design recommendations are provided for both allowable stress design and load factor design. In both cases, major consideration is given to the fundamental behavior of the joint and its ultimate capacity.

The work on this manuscript was carried out at Fritz Engineering Laboratory, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pa. The Research Council on Riveted and Bolted Structural Joints sponsored the project from its inception in 1969.

The work has been guided by the Councils Committee on Specifications under the chairmanship of Dr. Theodore R. Higgins. Other members of the committee include: R. S. Belford, E. Chesson, Jr., M. F. Godfrey, F. E. Graves, R. M. Harris, H. A. Krentz, F. R. Ling, W. H. Munse, W. Pressler, E. J. Ruble, J. L. Rumpf, T. W. Spilman, F. Stahl, and W. M. Thatcher. The authors are grateful for the advice and guidance provided by the committee. Many helpful suggestions were made during the preparation of the manuscript. Sincere appreciation is also due the Research Council on Riveted and Bolted Structural Joints and Lehigh University for supporting this work.

A book of this magnitude would not have been possible without the assistance of the many organizations who have sponsored research on riveted and bolted structural joints at Fritz Engineering Laboratory. Much of the research on the behavior of riveted and bolted structural joints that was conducted at Fritz Engineering Laboratory provided background for this study and was drawn on extensively. Those sponsoring this work include the American Institute of Steel Construction, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, the Research Council on Riveted and Bolted Structural Joints, the United States Department of Transportation-Federal Highway Administration, and the Louisiana Department of Transportation.

The authors are particularly grateful for the advice provided by Dr. Theodore R. Higgins and Dr. Geoffrey L. Kulak. Many helpful suggestions were provided that greatly improved the manuscript and design recommendations.

TOC

1. Introduction 1
1.1 Purpose and Scope, 1
1.2 Historical Notes, 1
1.3 Types and Mechanical Properties of Structural Fasteners, 3
2. General Provisions 9
2.1 Structural Steels, 9
2.2 Types of Connections, 12
2.3 Loads, 16
2.4 Factor of Safety—Load Factor Design, 17
2.5 Bolted and Riveted Shear Splices, 18
2.6 Fatigue, 20
2.7 Fracture, 22
3. Rivets 27
3.1 Rivet Types, 27
3.2 Installation of Rivets, 27
3.3 Behavior of Individual Fasteners, 29
3.3.1 Rivets Subjected to Tension, 29
3.3.2 Rivets Subjected to Shear, 30
3.3.3 Rivets Subjected to Combined Tension and Shear, 31
3.4 Basis for Design Recommendations, 33
3.4.1 Rivets Subjected to Tension, 33
3.4.2 Rivets Subjected to Shear, 33
3.4.3 Rivets Subjected to Combined Tension and Shear, 33
4. Bolts 35
4.1 Bolt Types, 35
4.2 Behavior of Individual Fasteners, 39
4.2.1 Bolts Subjected to Tension, 39
4.2.2 Bolts Subjected to Shear, 44
4.2.3 Bolts Subjected to Combined Tension and Shear, 50
4.3 Installation of High-Strength Bolts, 52
4.4 Relaxation, 61
4.5 Reuse of High-Strength Bolts, 62
4.6 Galvanized Bolts and Nuts, 63
4.7 Use of Washers, 65
4.8 Corrosion and Embrittlement, 66
4.9 Effect of Nut Strength, 69
4.10 Basis for Design Recommendations, 70
4.10.1 Bolts Subjected to Tension, 70
4.10.2 Bolts Subjected to Shear, 71
4.10.3 Bolts Subjected to Combined Tension and Shear, 71
5. Symmetric Butt Splices 74
5.1 Joint Behavior up to Slip, 74
5.1.1 Introduction, 74
5.1.2 Basic Slip Resistance, 74
5.1.3 Evaluation of Slip Characteristics, 75
5.1.4 Effect of Joint Geometry and Number of Faying Surfaces, 77
5.1.5 Joint Stiffness, 78
5.1.6 Effect of Type of Steel, Surface Preparation, and Treatment on the Slip Coefficient, 78
5.1.7 Effect of Variation in Bolt Clamping Force, 82
5.1.8 Effect of Grip Length, 89
5.2 Joint Behavior After Major Slip, 89
5.2.1 Introduction, 89
5.2.2 Behavior of Joints, 89
5.2.3 Joint Stiffness, 94
5.2.4 Surface Preparation and Treatment, 94
5.2.5 Load Partition and Ultimate Strength, 95
5.2.6 Effect of Joint Geometry, 99
5.2.7 Type of Fastener, 109
5.2.8 Effect of Grip Length, 111
5.2.9 Bearing Stress and End Distance, 112
5.3 Joint Behavior Under Repeated Loading, 116
5.3.1 Basic Failure Modes, 116
5.3.2 Fatigue Strength of Bolted Butt Joints, 118
5.4 Design Recommendations, 126
5.4.1 Introduction, 126
5.4.2 Design Recommendations—Fasteners, 128
5.4.3 Design Recommendations—Connected Material, 138
5.4.4 Design Recommendations for Bearing Stresses, 143
6. Truss-Type Connections 148
6.1 Introduction, 148
6.2 Behavior of Truss-Type Connections, 148
6.2.1 Static Loading, 148
6.2.2 Repeated Loading, 155
6.3 Design Recommendations, 156
7. Shingle Joints 158
7.1 Introduction, 158
7.2 Behavior of Shingle Joints, 158
7.3 Joint Stiffness, 162
7.4 Load Partition and Ultimate Strength, 162
7.5 Effect of Joint Geometry, 163
7.5.1 Effect of Variation in An/As Ratio and Joint Length, 163
7.5.2 Number of Fasteners per Region, 163
7.5.3 Number of Regions, 164
7.6 Design Recommendations, 165
7.6.1 Approximate Method of Analysis, 165
7.6.2 Connected Material, 170
7.6.3 Fasteners, 170
8. Lap Joints 171
8.1 Introduction, 171
8.2 Behavior of Lap Joints, 171
8.3 Design Recommendations, 174
8.3.1 Static Loading Conditions, 175
8.3.2 Repeated-Type Loading, 175
9. Oversize and Slotted Holes 176
9.1 Introduction, 176
9.2 Effect of Hole Size on Bolt Tension and Installation, 176
9.3 Joint Behavior, 180
9.3.1 Slip Resistance, 180
9.3.2 Ultimate Strength, 183
9.4 Design Recommendations, 183
10. Filler Plates between Surfaces 186
10.1 Introduction, 186
10.2 Types of Filler Plates and Load Transfer, 186
10.3 Design Recommendations, 192
11. Alignment of Holes 194
11.1 Introduction, 194
11.2 Behavior of Joints with Misaligned Holes, 194
11.3 Design Recommendations, 196
12. Surface Coatings 197
12.1 Introduction, 197
12.2 Effect of Type of Coating on Short-Duration Slip Resistance, 198
12.2.1 Hot-Dip Galvanizing, 198
12.2.2 Metallizing, 202
12.2.3 Zinc-Rich Paints, 202
12.2.4 Vinyl-Treated Surfaces, 206
12.3 Joint Behavior Under Sustained Loading, 208
12.4 Joint Behavior Under Repeated Loading, 210
12.5 Design Recommendations, 212
13. Eccentrically Loaded Joints 217
13.1 Introduction, 217
13.2 Behavior of a Fastener Group Under Eccentric Loading, 218
13.3 Analysis of Eccentrically Loaded Fastener Groups, 220
13.3.1 Slip-Resistant Joints, 221
13.3.2. Ultimate Strength Analysis, 223
13.4 Comparison of Analytical and Experimental Results, 225
13.5 Design Recommendations, 227
13.5.1 Connected Material, 227
13.5.2 Fasteners, 227
14. Combination Joints 232
14.1 Introduction, 232
14.2 Behavior of Combination Joints That Share Load on a Common Shear Plane, 234
14.2.1 High-Strength Bolts Combined with Welds, 235
14.2.2 High-Strength Bolts Combined with Rivets, 238
14 3 Design Recommendations 240
14.3.1 Static Loading Conditions, 241
14.3.2 Repeated Loading Conditions, 241
15. Gusset Plates 243
15.1 Introduction, 243
15.2 Method of Analysis and Experimental Work on Gusset Plates, 244
15.3 Design Recommendations, 253
16. Beam and Girder Splices 255
16.1 Introduction, 255
16.2 Types and Behavior of Beam-Girder Splices, 255
16.2.1 Flange Splices, 257
16.2.2 Web Splices, 259
16.3 Design Recommendations, 261
16.3.1 Flange Splices, 261
16.3.2 Web Splices, 262
17. Tension-Type Connections 263
17.1 Introduction, 263
17.2 Single Fasteners in Tension, 263
17.3 Bolt Groups Loaded in Tension—Prying Action, 266
17.4 Repeated Loading of Tension-Type Connections, 272
17.5 Analysis of Prying Action, 274
17.6 Design Recommendations, 282
17.6.1 Static Loading, 282
17.6.2 Repeated Loading, 286
18. Beam-to-Column Connections 289
18.1 Introduction, 289
18.2 Classification of Beam-to-Column Connections, 290
18.3 Behavior of Beam-to-Column Connections, 292
18.3. 1 Flexible Beam-to-Column Connections, 293
18.3.2 Semi-Rigid Connections, 300
18.3.3 Rigid Connections, 301
18.4 Stiffener Requirements for Bolted Beam-to-Column Connections, 313
18.5 Design Recommendations, 317

Contribute Article
Spider Optimizer

© Copyright 2000 - 2018, by Engineers Edge, LLC www.engineersedge.com
All rights reserved
Disclaimer | Feedback | Advertising | Contact

Date/Time:


User Reviews/Comments:

There are currently no comments available.


Add a Comment (you must be logged in to post comment Register):
Name:
Email: (Optional)
Comment: